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Office of Indigenization to host presentation from the Honorable Judge Marion Buller, Chief Commissioner for the National Inquiry into MMIWG

The Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) will observe the National Day of Action for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) by highlighting and recognizing the persistence of violence against Indigenous women and girls. 

This is an important date for JIBC to reflect on the central role justice and public safety professionals play in ending violence against Indigenous women and girls and in facilitating positive relationships between law enforcement and women who have experienced violence and families of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

As the occasion is held annually on Oct. 4, JIBC and its Office of Indigenization will mark the day on Monday, Oct. 5 with two speakers, the Honorable Judge Marion Buller, from the Mistawasis First Nation, and Elaine Alec, who is from the Sylix (Okanagan) and Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nations.

Judge Buller, the Chief Commissioner for the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, will present a pre-recorded keynote address on JIBC’s unique role and responsibilities, in ending violence against Indigenous women, girls and members of our 2SLGBTQQIA communities, and in advancing the Calls For Justice. Judge Buller will provide the context and history that led to the creation of the national inquiry, the process that occurred as a result of its mandate, and the published findings. Judge Buller’s message is intended to inspire urgent action of all Canadians, especially those working in justice and public safety, to address this national crisis.

JIBC’s Office of Indigenization will also host Cultivating Safe Spaces, a workshop with Elaine Alec, which aims to show participants how to create safe spaces in which they can promote diversity and inclusion in planning, governance and business, and enable healing, change and justice to take place.

“JIBC recognizes that violence against Indigenous women and girls is deeply rooted in Canada’s history and that systemic racism and discrimination exists in Canadian society, be it targeting people due to their cultural and ethnic background, faith, sexual orientation, or gender,” said Dr. Michel Tarko, President and CEO of JIBC. “This goes against JIBC’s vision of safer communities and a more just society.”

The Institute embraces diversity, inclusivity and social justice advocacy as qualities we believe are an inherent part of what it is to be Canadian. In fact, these values form an integral part of the education and training we provide to justice and public safety professionals, our future community heroes.

JIBC stands in solidarity with the families of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and with all those facing systemic racism and discrimination and pledges to do its part to one day make it a thing of the past.


ABOUT JUSTICE INSTITUTE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) is Canada’s leading public safety educator with a mission to develop dynamic justice and public safety professionals through its exceptional applied education, training and research. JIBC offers internationally recognized education that leads to certificates, diplomas, bachelor’s degrees and graduate certificates; exceptional continuing education for work and career-related learning and development; and customized contract training to government agencies and private organizations worldwide. Our education provides professionals with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to excel at every stage of their career contributing to safer communities and a more just society.